2021 Indigenous Communities Fellowship

Selected

Nurturing Plants

An innovative hydroponic system to increase food security in the Navajo Nation

Team Lead

Breanna Lameman

Solution Overview

Solution Name:

Nurturing Plants

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

One-line solution summary:

Hydroponic System: an innovative solution to increase food security in the Navajo Nation

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

Pitch your solution.

The Navajo Nation is at the front line of climate change and experiencing severe drought due to extraction companies near or on the reservation, that is affecting our traditional plants, food production, and food access. Climate change has been exacerbating economic, social, environmental tensions, that contributes to food and water insecurity. We are feeling the effects, especially our Diné who are closely related the land and rely on the land for sustenance and cultural vitality.

Hydroponic farming has the strong potential to mitigate the threats these issues pose to our food system. The crops can be grown outdoor, indoor, and anywhere at any time of the year, regardless of weather conditions, space, soil quality, or limited access to water. This system is year-around supply of traditional foods and contributes to economic and nutritional benefits, while using 90% of less water. The increase use will improve food security and overall health.

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

Film your elevator pitch.

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

What specific problem are you solving?

Nurturing Plants aims to increase food accessibility and food sovereignty in the Navajo Nation. We have been hit hard by drought and climate change that has impacted our agriculture and water security. The Nation has become more reliant on food imports rather than growing their own traditional foods. We are classified as a food desert by the USDA, with only 13 grocery stores operating within the Navajo Nation. The stores operating predominantly offer highly processed foods with low nutritional value, poor quality, and higher prices than off-reservation stores. This contributes to low access to a grocery store and is associated with decreased shopping frequency and increased obesity prevalence that impacts the food security and health. The Navajo Nation food insecurity rates are among the highest reported in the United States, at 76.7%. Our efforts are cost-efficient and effective, they can be integrated in the home or outside without needing fertile soil, plentiful water, or open land. Using this system is accessible to everyone that can grow plentiful of healthy foods that will improve food security and nutrition. This technique will also lead to revitalizing traditional foods and knowledge in the rural communities that have less access to water.

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

What is your solution?

Our solution is integrating an ebb & flow hydroponic system and is known as a flood and drain system. It is low-cost to set up and extremely versatile. The plants are placed in a 2-inch net pot, which is periodically filled with nutrient-rich water pumped out of a water storage. This system uses gravity to return water to the storage to be reused. This system requires little maintenance and produces food plants efficiently with little electricity or water use.

This low-cost system is feasible for rural areas and it is simple to assemble. The best way to deal with health issues regarding lack of nutritious food is to increase the diet of leafy greens and fruits which is difficult for Navajo families to access. We understand the need the communities don’t have the same access to fresh foods in other towns and we want to be there to help produce fresher produce right in their home to help feed and also remedy disease. This will not only combat health issues but also increase education about sustainability, nutrition, the environment, and traditional knowledge about the traditional foods being grown.

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

Strong preference will be given to Native-led solutions that directly benefit and are located within the Indigenous communities. Which community(s) does your solution benefit?

We are a Native-led organization providing services to Native communities in the Navajo Nation and surround communities that seek our services. Our main targeted area is the Navajo Nation in rural areas that have limited access to resources to farm such as space, water, and soil, however, we want to supply hydroponic systems to youth to provide them an understanding of system and how easy it is operate and maintain. Providing rural areas with hydroponic systems will revitalize traditional foodways and knowledge of our traditional plants. Our efforts will uplift the physical, cultural, and spiritual health of Native community members living in the Navajo Nation. We cultivate a holistic and nurturing environment for youth and community members to learn about hydroponic system, heirloom seeds, Native foodways, and the cultural knowledge of, songs, recipes, and practices that has always sustained the Diné way of life.  

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

Which dimension of the Fellowship does your solution most closely address?

Provide healthy and sovereign food, sustainable energy, and safe water
Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

Explain how the problem you are addressing, the solution you have designed, and the population you are serving align with the Challenge.

The implementation of hydroponic system in the Navajo Nation, especially in the most rural and difficult areas to access provides greater access to healthy foods and increases food sovereignty and sustainable energy while increasing cultural revitalization. Our solution is cultural appropriate and responsive to the respective communities we serve, while valuing Indigenous voices and knowledge through this effort. We intend to motivate rural and local youth to restore their traditional foods that use to grow in the rural areas they lived to increase their control over their natural resources and food system. 

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

In what city, town, or region is your solution team headquartered?

Navajo, NM, USA
Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

What is your solution’s stage of development?

Pilot: An organization deploying a tested product, service, or business model in at least one community.
Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

Explain why you selected this stage of development for your solution.

The hydroponic system is being implemented in one community as of now, however, we want to expand our efforts in more rural communities and understand their challenges and benefits. The number of people who are benefiting from the hydroponic system is two individuals. The individuals get to choose their choice of seeds they want to grow and we provide them with basic understand of the functions and operations of system and provide them further understanding of the cultural knowledge of the seeds and the language revitalization.

 

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

Who is the Team Lead for your solution?

Breanna Lameman

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

Please indicate the tribal affiliation of your primary delegate.

Navajo

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

Is your primary delegate a member of the community in which your project is based?

Yes
Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.
More About Your Solution

Which of the following categories best describes your solution?

A new application of an existing technology
Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

Describe what makes your solution innovative?

The hydroponic system can be built many ways, however, the way we built it is using an ebb & flow hydroponic system. We us PVC piping (10 ft or longer), submersible hydroponic pump, PVC elbow connectors, one PVC cap, a larger 30-gallon container, net pots, timer (if needed), vermiculite, nutrient solution, and seeds. Building your own hydroponic system, is cost efficient and simple to assemble. This solution isn’t new and can be built in different ways while be cost-efficient and cost-effective.

The hydroponic system is designed to circulate a nutrient solution to the plants, thus the plants at the beginning of the circulation system receives the most nutrients. This has proven to work by the absence of soil, water works by providing nutrients, hydrations, and oxygen to plant life. From watermelon to chilies to flowers, plants flourish under the care of hydroponics. It uses minimal space, 90% less water than traditional agricultural, and they grow fruits, veggies, and flowers in half the time. This system uses gravity to return water to the storage to be reused. This system requires little maintenance and produces food plants efficiently with little electricity or water use. Through the technology, hydroponics has been used since ancient ages and is a timeless and dynamic method of water conservation and crop production.

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

Describe the core technology that powers your solution.

The core technology that powers are solution is using a hydroponic system that simply uses nutrient water flowing through PVC pipes without using soil. This innovative technology focuses on using less water than traditional soil-based systems. This system uses gravity to recycle the water to return to storage to be reused. The recycled and filtered water can re-populate with nutrients and fed back into the plants where the water is being recycled instead of wasting it. The resources are being recycled and drained into a water container to use throughout the 2 month span and refilled when needed.

 

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

Provide evidence that this technology works. Please cite your sources.

The hydroponic systems are being used in rural and urban areas that either lack water, electricity, space, and nutritious soil. As seen in this article, hydroponic systems have several advantages such as producing greater number of crops, can be used in closed spaces, uses less water, and does not depend on the weather if placed inside, and it is environmentally friendly. The ebb & flow hydroponic system is widely used in rural areas, which we have been using this type of hydroponic system.

References

1. Comparation of Hydroponic System Design for Rural Communities in Indonesia.Authors: Edi Setiadi Putra, J. Jamaludin, M. Djalu Djatmiko

https://mail.theartsjournal.org/index.php/site/article/view/1490/681

2. Hydroponics as an advanced technique for vegetable production: An overview Authors: Nisha Sharma, Somen Acharya, Kaushal Kumar Narendra Singh And O.P. Chaurasia

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Somen-Acharya/publication/330080392_Hydroponics_as_an_advanced_technique_for_vegetable_production_An_overview/links/5c2c48c5a6fdccfc7077008f/Hydroponics-as-an-advanced-technique-for-vegetable-production-An-overview.pdf

 

 

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

Please select the technologies currently used in your solution:

  • Ancestral Technology & Practices
  • Manufacturing Technology
Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

Does this technology introduce any risks? How are you addressing or mitigating these risks in your solution?

There is no risk in using a hydroponic system. In fact, there is no use of pesticides, no soil erosion (doesn’t use soil), and no harm to local ecosystem.

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

What is your theory of change?

Current Situation/Risk Factors:

The risk factors are lack knowledge and interest in growing food, lack of space, expensive healthy foods, low access to a grocery store, and lack of knowledge about hydroponics.

 Inputs:

-Community members

            -Local leaders, farmers, and youth

-Collaborative Partners

            -Shiprock Chapter House

            -Shiprock Area Food Access Coalition

            -Shiprock Office of Diné Youth

            -Healthy Futures

            -Diné CARE

            -Shiprock Farmers Market

            -San Juan Harvest Food Hub.  

-Materials:

            -Training workshops

            -Training materials

-Traditional Knowledge

            -Elders wisdom

            -Ancestral foodways

 Outputs

-Activities participates will do

            -Attend hydroponics workshops

            -Attend nutritional/cooking education classes

            -Planting and maintaining produce workshops

            - Attend peer mentoring group

 -Activity Metrics to track completion

            -Workshops will consist of 20 farmers

            -Pre-post test knowledge

                        - Quantitative methods

            -Interviews with participants

                        - Qualitative methods

Outcomes/Impact:

Short-Impact:

             -Increase nutrient education

             -Increase appreciate and knowledge for local food systems

             -Increase the ability to grow foods

             -Increase access to fresh foods

             -Increase connection to community

 Medium-Impact:

             -Increase vegetable & fruit consumption/healthy eating

             -Increase knowledge of traditional agriculture practices

 Long-Impact:

             -Improve hydroponic practices

             -Improve Indigenous food ways

             -Improve food security

             -Improve health and well-being of the people

 

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

Select the key characteristics of your target population.

  • Women & Girls
  • Children & Adolescents
  • Elderly
  • Rural
  • Poor
  • Low-Income
  • Middle-Income
  • Persons with Disabilities
Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

Which of the UN Sustainable Development Goals does your solution address?

  • 1. No Poverty
  • 2. Zero Hunger
  • 3. Good Health and Well-being
  • 9. Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
  • 11. Sustainable Cities and Communities
  • 12. Responsible Consumption and Production
  • 15. Life on Land
Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

In which state(s) do you currently operate?

  • New Mexico
Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

In which state(s) will you be operating within the next year?

  • Arizona
  • New Mexico
Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

How many people does your solution currently serve? How many will it serve in one year? In five years?

Currently, we are supporting 2 farmers in Shiprock, NM. In year one, we plan to serve 20 individuals who are either farmers, interested in growing food, or living in a rural area and living more than 30 miles away from a grocery store. Within the next five years, we plan on integrating over 1,000 individuals in utilizing a hydroponic system. The increase use of hydroponic use will increase food security and knowledge about Diné foods.  

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

What are your impact goals for the next year and the next five years, and -- importantly -- how will you achieve them?

In the next year, our impact goals are increase nutrient education, appreciate and knowledge for local food systems, the ability to grow foods, access to fresh foods, and increase connection to community through our hydroponic system. In order to achieve these goals, we will provide educational workshops about hydroponics, nutrition, Diné foodways, planting and maintaining produce, and provide a peer mentoring group. The knowledge provided to those who are wanting to learn more about the hydroponic system and their traditional foodways will increase their knowledge and understanding about food sovereignty.

In the next five years, our long-term goals are improving agricultural practices, Diné food ways, food security, vegetable & fruit consumption/healthy eating, and the health and well-being of the people. To achieve this, we will continue to provide educational workshops and sessions and also increase the number of participants to use hydroponics as an alternative to growing food. We intend to target areas that are 15-45 miles away from a grocery store to further increase access to healthy foods.

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

How are you measuring your progress toward your impact goals?

A mixed methods approach will be used to evaluate the intervention by incorporating both quantitative and qualitative methods. The integration of mixed methods evaluation will provide validity to confirm qualitative and quantitative data, offset the weaknesses of both methods used and draw on each other's strengths. Adding the use of quantitative and qualitative evaluation methods will give a more nuanced and complete understanding of the issue and more confidence in findings. To evaluate the performance/progress is to utilize the qualitative methods. As for the outcomes/impact, quantitative methods will be used.

The qualitative methods used will evaluate the performance, program participants concerns and recommendations, and program staff concerns. This will include the quality of services provided, monitor activities implemented, staff competency, strengthens and weakness of the program, and implement cultural appropriate activities in a respectful matter. The program’s performance will be evaluated by a semi-structured interview conducted by the interview who is not a program staff. The semi-structured interview will use a researcher interview guide and the guide will consist of series of questions.

The quantitative methods used to evaluate the long-term outcomes are to improve revitalization of traditional agricultural practices, Indigenous food ways (food sovereignty), food security, and ultimately led to the health and well-being of the people. The quantitative method I will use to obtain these changes is using a pre-post questionnaire. The pre-post questionnaire is to gain detailed insight from the participants about if they gained knowledge and benefitted from the program.

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

What barriers currently exist for you to accomplish your goals in the next year and in the next five years?

The primary barrier is financial support. Currently, we are seeking funding and applying to as many grants to support our efforts. While this solution aims to increase food security we also want to focus on cultural knowledge and the science behind using a hydroponic system that will also increase traditional food knowledge in the communities we seek to serve. 

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

How do you plan to overcome these barriers?

To overcome the barrier of financial support, we have been applying to multiple grants and seeking support from our collaborative partners. We will continue to work with local herbalist and traditional healers about this solution to understand their perspectives. 

 

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.
About Your Team

What type of organization is your solution team?

Nonprofit

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

How many people work on your solution team?

1 full time 

2 part time 

10 volunteers

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

How long have you been working on your solution?

7 months

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

Why are you and your team well-positioned to deliver this solution?

Breanna Lameman, the team lead, has prior experience as an Indigenous researcher and educator, in conjunction, with her Bachelor of Science degree in Public Health with an emphasis on health behaviors and health promotion and a graduate certificate in Foundations for Biomedical Science PhDs Serving in Indigenous Cultures that will benefit and improve tribal health disparities. Currently, she is a graduate student in Health Promotion Health Behaviors in the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health at the University of Arizona with a focus on Indigenous health and disparities among the Indigenous communities. She is also a 4th generational farmer in Shiprock, NM. She has over 10 years of farming experience and working with the community.

Kyle Jim, Executive Director of Diné Introspective, originated from the Navajo Nation and lives in the community of Shiprock. He is a community organizer and activist for over 10 years. His ambition as an Indigenous person is to evolve spiritually and transform his environment to greater heights. He chose to be a leader, accepts responsibilities, and take full credit of his actions. He reflects upon my ancestors, works with his relatives, and serves the children.

Our members are from the communities we serve. They come from various backgrounds, expertise, and experiences ranging from educators, scientist, healers, community organizers, farmers, and Indigenous chef. Their understanding of the community creates a learning experience with interactive intergenerational dialogue and knowledge exchanges with traditional knowledge holders, farmers, and artist, and teachers.

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

What is your approach to building a diverse, equitable, and inclusive leadership team?

The members are Diné. The problems we are solving are by Diné for Diné. We understand our community needs and wants. We embrace and encompass our Diné culture through our work and our organization. We young Diné adults have dedicated our lives to truly uplift and strengthen the Navajo Nation. To achieve this, we stand together and network with our local leaders, community organizers, educators, and elders. Understanding this Fourth World of politics, commercial trade, fiat currency, policy, and jurisdiction, we stand for equality. The healing process starts with ceremony within and supporting each other as we are proactive. We inspire to encourage and motivative Native people to express themselves in a healthy manner while maintaining the natural warrior stance. 

As we honor our ancestor and serve our relatives, we unite for prosperity. We strive for evolution and prepare to emerge as we balance our Dine culture in this New World. Within our sacred lands, we will defend, demand, and expand our spirit to communicate with all life. 

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.
Your Business Model & Partnerships

Do you primarily provide products or services directly to individuals, to other organizations, or to the government?

Individual consumers or stakeholders (B2C)
Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.
Partnership & Prize Funding Opportunities

Why are you applying to Solve?

We are applying to Solve because we have seen Solve among the Navajo Nation and assist with our Diné relatives. As a local Native-led organization we want to continue to expand our networking and find mentors who are able to guide us in the right direction of funding and resources. We are applying because we know our solution will improve food security and the health and wellbeing of our people. The difficulty we have in further our efforts is funding. We are hoping SOLVE will expand and support our efforts. Our Diné relatives are eager to learn especially traditional knowledge, teachings, and practices. Further, we are passionate about the land, water, plants, and animals. We want to continue taking care of the land as it has been taking care of us. Lastly, we are committed to our efforts that we have been doing for a couple of months now.

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

In which of the following areas do you most need partners or support?

  • Business model (e.g. product-market fit, strategy & development)
  • Financial (e.g. improving accounting practices, pitching to investors)
  • Public Relations (e.g. branding/marketing strategy, social and global media)
  • Monitoring & Evaluation (e.g. collecting/using data, measuring impact)
  • Technology (e.g. software or hardware, web development/design, data analysis, etc.)
Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

Please explain in more detail here.

While this effort is a collaborative one, we seek multiple support in different areas of expertise such as assistance in revising our business model, improving our financials, public relations, monitoring and evaluating our effort, and using high technology. We want feedback on our business model and how to pitch our efforts to investors in an effective matter, to operate our efforts successfully. Secondly, we also want to improve our financials by keeping up to date with accounting records and meeting and reorganizing. Thirdly, we want to learn about how to brand our efforts to meet the needs of our participants and possible tribal nations. As for monitoring and evaluation, we have the understanding how to conduct our data analysis and evaluate our effort, however, we want to learn more. Lastly, technology is a major assistance we need for reevaluating our hydroponic system to run more effectively and efficiently.

 

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

What organizations would you like to partner with, and how would you like to partner with them?

We would love to partner with MIT. There is opportunity for growth and networking with the organization that we could teach them, and they could teach us. With your help, you can support our program, families, and future farmers.  We also want to partner with tribal colleges and universities to teach traditional knowledge and modern technology that will sustain Dine practices, culture, and languages; First Nations Development Institute, Native American Agriculture fund, The University of Arizona Indige-FEWSS, and other Native-led organizations. We are much excited to share hydroponic system and ancestral knowledge from the simplistic natural elements of life to the birth of a seed. We want to build knowledge from the ground, document with current technology to share, and reclaim ancestral knowledge.

 

                                                     

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

Do you qualify for and would you like to be considered for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Prize? If you select Yes, explain how you are qualified for the prize in the additional question that appears.

Yes, I wish to apply for this prize

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

Explain how you are qualified for this prize. How will your team use Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Prize to advance your solution?

Watering food plants is committed to sustainable system changes and long-term solutions while also addressing food insecurity on the Navajo Nation by implementing an ebb & flow hydroponic system. An ebb & flow hydroponic system is known as a flood and drain system, it is one of the most widely recognized system. It is low-cost to set up and extremely versatile. The plants are placed in a 2-inch net pot, which is periodically filled with nutrient-rich water pumped out of a water storage. This system uses gravity to return water to the storage to be reused. This system requires little maintenance and produces food plants efficiently with little electricity or water use.

This system can be grown in small spaces without using soil, pesticides, weed-free, and uses less time and energy. This is ideal for small households or rural areas that face drought and climate change. The hydroponic system cost is around $150 per system and produces 20 food plants. While being cost-efficient and effective, this system is environmentally friendly and produce large amounts of crops in a short time from a small area, especially in rural areas where it is difficult to access a grocery store. This system is year-around supply of fresh fruits and vegetables that produces not only food consumption but economic and nutritional benefits. This is one way to improve food insecurity in the Navajo Nation and improve overall health.

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

Do you qualify for and would you like to be considered for The ASA Prize for Equitable Education? If you select Yes, explain how you are qualified for the prize in the additional question that appears.

Yes, I wish to apply for this prize

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

Explain how you are qualified for this prize. How will your team use The ASA Prize for Equitable Education to advance your solution?

Watering food plants is committed to sustainable system changes and long-term solutions while also addressing food insecurity on the Navajo Nation by implementing an ebb & flow hydroponic system. An ebb & flow hydroponic system is known as a flood and drain system, it is one of the most widely recognized system. It is low-cost to set up and extremely versatile. The plants are placed in a 2-inch net pot, which is periodically filled with nutrient-rich water pumped out of a water storage. This system uses gravity to return water to the storage to be reused. This system requires little maintenance and produces food plants efficiently with little electricity or water use.

 This system can be grown in small spaces without using soil, pesticides, weed-free, and uses less time and energy. This is ideal for small households or rural areas that face drought and climate change. The hydroponic system cost is around $150 per system and produces 20 food plants. While being cost-efficient and effective, this system is environmentally friendly and produce large amounts of crops in a short time from a small area, especially in rural areas where it is difficult to access a grocery store. This system is year-around supply of fresh fruits and vegetables that produces not only food consumption but economic and nutritional benefits. This is one way to improve food insecurity in the Navajo Nation and improve overall health.

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

Do you qualify for and would you like to be considered for the Innovation for Women Prize? If you select Yes, explain how you are qualified for the prize in the additional question that appears.

Yes, I wish to apply for this prize

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

Explain how you are qualified for this prize. How will your team use the Innovation for Women Prize to advance your solution?

Watering food plants is committed to sustainable system changes and long-term solutions while also addressing food insecurity on the Navajo Nation by implementing an ebb & flow hydroponic system. An ebb & flow hydroponic system is known as a flood and drain system, it is one of the most widely recognized system. It is low-cost to set up and extremely versatile. The plants are placed in a 2-inch net pot, which is periodically filled with nutrient-rich water pumped out of a water storage. This system uses gravity to return water to the storage to be reused. This system requires little maintenance and produces food plants efficiently with little electricity or water use.

 This system can be grown in small spaces without using soil, pesticides, weed-free, and uses less time and energy. This is ideal for small households or rural areas that face drought and climate change. The hydroponic system cost is around $150 per system and produces 20 food plants. While being cost-efficient and effective, this system is environmentally friendly and produce large amounts of crops in a short time from a small area, especially in rural areas where it is difficult to access a grocery store. This system is year-around supply of fresh fruits and vegetables that produces not only food consumption but economic and nutritional benefits. This is one way to improve food insecurity in the Navajo Nation and improve overall health.

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

Do you qualify for and would you like to be considered for The AI For Humanity Prize? If you select Yes, explain how you are qualified for the prize in the additional question that appears.

Yes, I wish to apply for this prize

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

Explain how you are qualified for this prize. How will your team use the Innovation for Women Prize to advance your solution?

Watering food plants is committed to sustainable system changes and long-term solutions while also addressing food insecurity on the Navajo Nation by implementing an ebb & flow hydroponic system. An ebb & flow hydroponic system is known as a flood and drain system, it is one of the most widely recognized system. It is low-cost to set up and extremely versatile. The plants are placed in a 2-inch net pot, which is periodically filled with nutrient-rich water pumped out of a water storage. This system uses gravity to return water to the storage to be reused. This system requires little maintenance and produces food plants efficiently with little electricity or water use.

 This system can be grown in small spaces without using soil, pesticides, weed-free, and uses less time and energy. This is ideal for small households or rural areas that face drought and climate change. The hydroponic system cost is around $150 per system and produces 20 food plants. While being cost-efficient and effective, this system is environmentally friendly and produce large amounts of crops in a short time from a small area, especially in rural areas where it is difficult to access a grocery store. This system is year-around supply of fresh fruits and vegetables that produces not only food consumption but economic and nutritional benefits. This is one way to improve food insecurity in the Navajo Nation and improve overall health.

Add a comment

Read comments
No comments to show.

Solution Team

  • BL BL
    Breanna Lameman Chair Board & Diné Researcher, Diné Introspective
 
    Back
to Top