11 Comments
NM NM Nicholas Marritz

I played through the demo and it's great!

Miss Nicole Pretorius

Incredible project by an incredibly genuine and motivated team. You have my support!

Miss Dee Saigal

Thanks Nicole!

Katie Rae

In response to Why our solution will solve the problem:

I'd like to know more about your beta-testing -great that some girls were inspired to become coders - but not sure how strongly the data suggests (based on the others listed) the game's ability to target to programming/coding specifically.

Also, how long do typical users use the game for?

Miss Dee Saigal

Dear Katie,

We carried out one-to-one beta-testing with students aged 8-13 from Oasis Academies (a group of 48 schools in the UK) for eighteen months. The results showed that Erase All Kittens didn't just give girls an introduction to practical coding skills whilst eliminating 'technophobia' - it also inspired them to become researchers, teachers, problem solvers, team builders, writers, and designers, as well as coders.

Another benefit was that E.A.K. allowed teachers to become facilitators of autonomous, independent learning, as girls immediately became very engaged - teaching themselves and other students.

With regards to the game's ability to target programming/coding specifically - we are building E.A.K. to bridge the huge gap between young girls learning computational thinking, and learning practical skills, which can be used to create on the web. So far, the game contains a lot of interactive dialogue, and teaches basic HTML syntax and about URLs. We are working with Playerthree, an award-winning independent games development studio, to design and build further levels teaching HTML, CSS and Javascript skills.

Our long-term goal is to show girls how to design and build their own levels in the game, and eventually, their own simple websites.

Users typically play for 20-30 minutes, and we've collected our data from one-to-one testing, 12,000+ feedback forms and Google Analytics.

Katie Rae

In response to How long it will take to scale beyond our pilot:

Curious what your plan is for scaling

Miss Dee Saigal

We are planning to scale by primarily targeting parents and also, schools, initially in the UK & US.

To target to parents, we will form affiliate and distribution partnerships with organisations including Mumsnet (the UK's biggest parenting website) and Barclays (Code Playground), and E.A.K. will be marketed using Facebook ads, blogs and YouTube videos. We are designing an iPad version of E.A.K. which will be sold on the Appstore - since 9 out of 10 parents now want their kids to learn digital skills, we anticipate that B2C will be the major market.

Our aim is to continue making a code education game that girls love and learn from, rather than focusing heavily on aligning to the UK curriculum and implementing assessment tools.

With schools, we will initially focus on girls schools which we have already had success with, and independent schools in the UK and US. We have partnered with CoderDojo - offering free E.A.K. accounts which can only be used in sessions, and there are around 10,000 code clubs globally. Since teachers and parents look to code clubs when deciding which tools to purchase, we will use crossover marketing to sell E.A.K. to these markets.

We have also partnered with Microsoft Education, which will allow millions of students access to the PC version of the game, and we have formed a one-for-one initiative - for every E.A.K. account sold, one will be given to a girl in Syria, Lebanon or India, via schools and organisations, such as Techfugees.

Katie Rae

In response to How we will measure our progress:

Great to see near term and long term target goals.

 
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