Solution Summary

If girls aren’t interested in STEM subjects by age 11, they are unlikely to ever become interested. To inspire girls at a young age, Erase All Kittens (EAK) transforms the way girls perceive code education and software engineering. EAK is the first game designed from the ground up to teach them practical, real-world coding skills via highly gamified, story-driven gameplay.

Market Opportunity

  • Employment in STEM is growing faster than employment in all other occupations — with higher than average salaries. Yet, women are underrepresented in STEM jobs. In the US for example, women make up only 24 percent of STEM workers according to the Department of Commerce.
  • According to Girls Who Code, there will be 1.4 million jobs available in computing-related fields by 2020. Graduates are on track to fill 29 percent of those jobs, but women are on track to fill only 3 percent.

Highlights

  • Over 120,000 players in 145 countries to date
  • Featured in Forbes 30 Under 30 Asia (2018)
  • Held coding workshop for girls in Syria with Techfugees

Organization Goals

  • Design and build EAK for the iPad, introducing HTML, CSS, and Javascript
  • Teach HTML and CSS by June 2018, with five to six hours completed further HTML, CSS, and Javascript by December 2018

Existing Partnerships

Erase All Kittens currently partners with:

  • CoderDojo for distribution and marketing
  • Techfugees for one-for-one scheme
  • Playerthree game studio for development
  • Microsoft Education for distribution
  • Other partners include: BBC, Web We Want, Mozilla Foundation, Girls Day School Trust, and Duke of York’s iDEA initiative

Partnership Goals

Erase All Kittens seeks:

  • Partners to expand outreach to parents and schools across US
  • Impact measurement and evaluation partners
  • Funding to develop mobile versions with advanced features and mechanics

Solver Team

Organization Type:
For profit

Headquarters:
London, UK

Company Stage:
Pilot

Working in:
UK

Employees:
3

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