Megan J. Smith

3rd U.S. Chief Technology Officer, Entrepreneur, Engineer, U.S. Office of Science and Technology Policy

Smith is an award-winning entrepreneur, engineer, technology leader and tech evangelist. She just completed services as the 3rd United States Chief Technology Officer, where Smith and her team focused on use of technology policy, data and innovation to advance the future of the nation and world.  The team added senior tech talent to policy tables (TQ) for work on topics from Artificial Intelligence and Federal Open Source to Precision Medicine; focused on broad capacity building with a wide range of partners addressing the capabilities of government including engagement on open data, open government, built the federal Data Science Cabinet and collaboratively brought tech talent to serve across government in programs like the Presidential Innovation Fellows, U.S. Digital Service and more.  The team further focused on capacity building the American people and the nation overall through creating all-hands-on-deck public-private programs like TechHire, ComputerScienceorAll, Image of STEM, Data Driven Justice, Police Data Initiative, Inclusive Entrepreneurship and Tech, community solutions innovation, and Active STEM.


Prior to her role as U.S. CTO, Smith served as Vice President of New Business Development at Google managing early-stage partnerships across the company’s global engineering and product teams for nine years; led acquisitions of Google Earth, Maps and Picasa, and GM-ed Google.org’s engineering transition adding Google Crisis Response, Google for Nonprofits, Earth Outreach/Engine and increased employee engagement. Later she served in the leadership team of Google[x] where she co-created SolveForX and Women Techmakers. Smith was CEO PlanetOut in the early days of the Internet, at General Magic on teams designing early smartphone technologies and at Apple Japan. She is an advisor to the MIT Media Lab, Vital Voices, and the Malala Fund, which she co-founded. Over the years, Smith has contributed to a wide range of engineering projects, including an award-winning bicycle lock, space station construction program, and solar cookstoves. She holds a bachelor's and master's degrees in mechanical engineering from MIT, where she now serves on the board. She was a member of the MIT student team that designed, built, and raced a solar car 2000 miles across the Australian outback. She completed her master's thesis work at the MIT Media Lab and has recently been elected to membership in the National Academy of Engineering.

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