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In the Boston Business Journal: What Does the Future of Work Look Like?

This article by Solve's Hala Hanna titled "What does the future of work look like?" was originally published as a Viewpoint in the Boston Business Journal. You can read the full piece here.

“What does the future of work look like?

“It is a question we can’t afford to speculate on, as automation, artificial intelligence, and the cloud are all changing the nature of work dramatically.

“Predictions about the impact of digital transformations on the job market are so disparate that only two certain conclusions can be made: We don’t know how many jobs will be lost or created due to technological progress, and dramatic change in the nature of work will continue to unfold. Augmented by machines or by algorithms, how we work will be transformed — whether on a Guangzhou factory floor or in high-rise offices in Boston.

“MIT Solve has made advancing solutions to tough challenges its mission. Solve, an initiative of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is a marketplace for social impact innovation that focuses on four issue areas: sustainability, health, learning, and economic prosperity — the last of which can’t be achieved without solid jobs.

“Tech advancements will create new jobs and industries we have yet to imagine. They will liberate us from rote tasks, increase our productivity and leave us time to explore our creativity. However, it is critical that we use technology to mitigate this transition for those left behind, and ensure it expands the possibilities for everyone to attain their full potential…”

Read the full article in The Boston Business Journal.

Do you have a solution to that will expand and enhance future work opportunities? Apply to the Work of the Future Challenge and join the Solve community. The deadline to apply is July 1.


Participants talk with each other during a Brain Trust Working Group on Economic Prosperity during Solve at MIT, May 17, 2018. (Photo by Adam Schultz / MIT Solve)

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